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Develpoment Education

Why is Moral Development Necessary in Children?

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“Actions speak louder than words” is an aphorism that can be used when considering moral reasoning versus moral behavior. It is one thing to have good intentions and good thinking and another to make good decisions in the heat of the moment. It is often too easy to come up with excuses and get carried away on those ‘solid priorities’.

Most people agree that morality is important and needs to be taught. But the consensus soon breaks down when it comes to what it is and how to teach it.

The question here is why moral development is necessary and how it relates to child development. In my opinion, developing morals is not a one-day process, but a process that lasts a lifetime. Just as we need food to sustain our bodies, we also need moral values ​​to sustain our minds and souls.

Along with moral development, emotional development is also necessary.

What is morality?

Morality is “the recognition of the distinction between good and evil or between right and wrong; respect for and obedience to the rules of right conduct; the mental disposition or characteristic of behaving in a manner intended to produce good results.”

Moral development is the process by which children develop appropriate attitudes and behaviors towards other people in society based on norms, social and cultural rules, and laws.

Let’s understand the process in detail

Levels of moral development in children

Moral development in children is gradual as they grow from infancy to adolescence and beyond. There are 5 main levels of moral development in children.

Infants (up to 2 years)

Infants cannot moralize. Their sense of right and wrong depends on their feelings and desires. After nine months in the womb, the baby expects parental care, so his sense of justice depends on whether or not his needs are met. Hunger and loneliness are uncomfortable feelings for your baby and don’t feel right. Being cared for, hugged, and fed feels good, while lack of response is scary and wrong.

Toddlers (2 to 3 years)

At this age, your toddler realizes that others have rights and needs as well. However, he has not yet understood the difference between good and bad.

Feelings of guilt are based on empathy and moral behavior. Depending on the actions conveyed by the parents, the young child understands that obedience is the norm.

Your toddler knows it’s wrong to take a toy from a sibling just because they might get into trouble. They understand why it is wrong to hit someone because they know that they will be punished for it. Thus, your child will tend to follow the rules to avoid punishment.

Preschoolers (3 to 5 years)

This is the age at which your child internalizes family values. Since rules and regulations are essential to the family discipline, they become important to your child as well. Your child expects the elderly or parents to take responsibility. They understand the role of a “child” and an “adult” and hope that they will be brought to maturity.

The child realizes that actions have consequences: “If I do this, it will happen.” The positive direction of the parents makes the child bond well and behave well. The separated child will do what they want unless and until they are caught.

Kids (7-10 years)

After the age of 7, children start questioning if the people who hold authoritative positions, such as teachers and parents, are infallible.
Your child will develop a strong sense of what he should and should not do. They would want to participate in making rules.

Children of this age develop a sense of fairness and understand the necessity of rules. They understand that children also have rights and filter the rules according to their best interests

Adolescents (11- 16 years)

As they reach adulthood, children begin to develop their own moral values ​​as they question and analyze those imposed by their parents. Your teen will broaden his or her moral horizons and see rules as a set of social guidelines that benefit everyone.

They value the rules, but they also negotiate. They take an interest in what is generally good for society, as they develop their abstract thinking skills. Your teen will begin to realize that the decision they are making affects those around them.

Your youngster wants to be accepted by his peers and can change his values ​​and morals.

Summing Up

Moral Development is about learning ‘values about love!’

Love expresses itself in its connections with one and all. It is a proper means of expression when there is a common essence at an individual, as well as, at its indefinable most universal level.

Good morale is the foundation of every society that will have the power to survive and last. Without appropriate moral development, society is bound to crumbles and education becomes obsolete. What are your views on this? Let us know in the comments below.

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Develpoment Education

Ways to Teach Students with Learning Disabilities

If a child can’t learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn

Ignacio Estrada

Children learn a lot of skills throughout their lives— reading, writing, listening, comprehending, calculating, and communicating. Some skills are more difficult to master than others. Every kid is unique and has varied needs. When some kids learn these skills really quickly, others struggle to keep up with their peers.

Surprisingly, learning disabilities or special learning abilities are rather prevalent, yet often misunderstood with academic failure. Kids with special needs fail to develop the knowledge, competence, motivation, and self-control needed to excel in important academic areas. They often drop out of school and end up being vulnerable to precarious employment prospects.

However, various research studies have proved that we can teach kids with learning disabilities to “learn how to learn”.

There are multiple institutions and support groups all around the world that are committed to helping these kids overcome the challenges including the British Institute of Learning Disabilities, National Center for Learning Disabilities, Council for Learning Disabilities, Mencap – The Voice of Learning Disabilities, Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities, and more.

In this blog, we will discuss the various ways we can teach students with learning disabilities.  Let’s dive in.

What are Learning Disabilities?

Learning disability is a phrase that refers to a variety of learning and thinking differences that can alter how the brain receives, processes, stores, and transmits data. The disabilities impair one’s use of spoken or written language, comprehend, perform mathematical computations, coordinate movements, or focus attention.

Children with learning impairments are just as smart as their peers, if not smarter. However, they may have difficulties writing, reading, spelling, reasoning, recalling and organizing if left to their own devices or taught in traditional ways.

According to Healthline, Dyslexia is the most prevalent learning disorder, accounting for 80 to 90% of all learning disabilities.

The most common Learning Disabilities or Special Learning Abilities include:

  1. Dyslexia – It is a learning disorder that impairs the kid’s ability to read, spell and speak.
  2. Dyscalculia – It refers to the difficulty in understanding numbers, retaining simple mathematical facts, or reasoning through word problems.
  3. Dysgraphia- The disorder impairs the individual’s ability to express themselves in writing. They may take hours to write a few sentences or have poor spelling problems.

Ways to Teach Students with Learning Disabilities

Homeschooling, tutoring and special schools can help children with a learning disability to learn at their own pace. Teachers can use a variety of strategies to assist students with learning disabilities.

Teaching Kids with Dyslexia or Reading Disabilities

  1. Do not ask the kids to read aloud.
  2. Give them quiet space to read.
  3. Use audiobooks or textbooks with large prints.
  4. When reading, encourage children to engage both their visual and auditory senses.
  5. Provide chapter outlines or study aids to students that emphasize important points in their reading.
  6. Ask students to reread the old stories to develop fluency.
  7. Encourage students to read the topics of their interests.
  8. Concentrate on exercises that incorporate the sound of words rather than letters or spellings.
  9. Demonstrate and teach your students to break down the short phrases into distinct words.
  10. Ask the kids to clap out syllables and try to generate rhymes.

Teaching kids with Dysgraphia or Writing Disabilities

  1. Provide printouts to the kids with Dysgraphia so there’s less to copy from the board.
  2. Be patient! Allow kids extra time to copy from the board or take notes.
  3. Allow your students to use laptops or computers for writing assignments.
  4. To aid in the formation of letters in the correct space, provide paper with different-coloured or raised lines.
  5. Teach students to proofread their assignments or allow them to use proofreaders to look for errors.
  6. If required, use speech-to-text or scribe so that students can dictate their answers.
  7. Give the student a partially finished outline to fill in the information beneath the key categories.
  8. Permit the use of tape recorders in the classroom.
  9. Provide them with a quiet area to write their tests.

Teaching Students with Dyscalculia or Calculation Disabilities

  1. Teach your students to draw diagrams and sketches to solve word problems.
  2. Show your students how to apply math in real life.
  3. Create tailored worksheets including word problems and number problems.
  4. Provide your students with graphical charts of formulas or multiplication tables.
  5. Allow the students to use calculators if required.
  6. You can use puzzles, coins and block to teach the math concepts.
  7. Use graph papers to align numbers and problems.
  8. Teach students how to comprehend the problem, devise a strategy to address it, follow out the plan, and check their work to ensure that the solution solves the problem.

To increase students’ grasp of assignments and the quality of their work, you can employ the following methods:

  1. Humiliating the kids with learning disabilities is a big no. Never display their work to their peers as an example of poor work. Rather, provide them with opportunities and praise them for every achievement.
  2. Explain the lessons and include step-to-step instructions, so that these children can understand the lessons.  
  3. Break down the learning tasks into smaller assignments.
  4. You can also use graphic organizers to present the information in a more understandable manner.
  5. Set specific expectations and communicate them clearly.
  6. Probe regularly to check progress and provide quality feedback.

Summing Up

Learning disabilities are surprisingly common around the world. In fact, difficulties with reading, writing or comprehending during the school years are the signs and symptoms of learning disorder.

However, the disorder doesn’t make the students less intelligent or lazy. They just learn differently.  In fact, students with learning disabilities possess average or above-average intelligence. However, there’s a gap between their potential learning and actual achievement. That is why learning disabilities are also referred to as “Hidden Disabilities”.

It is extremely crucial for the teachers to implement the strategies that are tailored according to the needs of these children. Moreover, kids with learning disabilities learn slow pace. So, you need to be patient and consistently work with them.

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Develpoment Lifestyle

Emotional development and 3 things you should know about it

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The theoretical viewpoint towards emotional development is a blend of functionalist and dynamical systems assumption. A child meeting with an environment is lively contact that engages numerous emotion-related components. These components modify over time as the child matures and in reaction to varying environmental relations. Emotional development imitates social experience, taking into account the cultural context too.

1. The Development of Emotional Capability

Understanding the Stages of Emotional Development in Children

A way to look at emotional operation is the extent to which it serves the individual’s adaptive and self-efficient ambitions. The construct emotional capability is projected as affect-oriented behavioral, cognitive, and rigid skills. These skills surface eventually as a person expands in a social context. Individual factors, for instance, cognitive development and temper, do certainly influence the development of emotional capabilities.

Though, the skills of emotional capability are also subjective to precedent social incidents and learnings. Also to a person’s relationship record, plus the system of way of life and values in which the person lives. Therefore, we vigorously produce our emotional experience, through the mutual control of our cognitive-developmental composition. Also through our social experience to emotional communication. During this process, we discover what it means to feel something and to do something about it.

2. Skills of Emotional Capability

  • Understanding of one’s emotional situation. Also, understanding that one is experiencing several emotions. An even more mature understanding that one might not be conscious of one’s feelings.

  • Skills in discriminating and accepting others’ emotions, based on situational and meaningful cues that have some harmony as to their emotional meaning.

  • Skill in using the terminology of emotion and expression in provisions usually available in one’s subculture and at a more mature rank to obtain cultural scripts that connect emotion with social roles.

  • The capability of empathic and sympathetic participation in others’ emotional incidents.

  • Skill in comprehending that inside emotional status need not relate to outer appearance, equally in oneself and others, and at a more mature altitude the ability to recognize that one’s emotional-expressive actions may impact another and take this into account in one’s self-presentation approach.

  • The ability for adaptive coping with stressful emotions utilizing self-regulatory approaches that improve the amount or duration of such emotional states.

  • Knowledge of the structure or nature of relations is in part defined by both the point of emotional immediacy or authenticity of communicative display and by the point of reciprocity or balance within the bond.

3. Positive Development and Emotional Competence

Different Emotions faced by individuals

Capable children and youth do not experience lives free of problems, but they have equally individual and environmental resources that assist them in handling a range of life events.

To know more about Behavioral Disorders in Children Click Here.

The skills of emotional capability are a bunch of resources that juveniles bring to their life’s varied challenges. Like development in other spheres, mastery of early skills is correlated to emotional development, such as effective parameters, which affect a child’s ability to steer future developmental challenges.

How Emotional Development can help your child

Different aspects that lead to Emotional Development in a Child

Potency in the area of emotional capability may assist children and adolescents handle efficiently particular situations. It promotes individuality associated with constructive developmental outcomes, with a sense of self-efficacy, pro-social behaviour, and compassionate relations with family and peers. Moreover, emotional capability serves as a shielding factor that diminishes the impact of a variety of risk factors.


Studies have isolated a person’s trait that may exert a defending influence. Some of which replicate core elements of emotional capability. Skills associated with interpreting interpersonal cues, solving troubles, performing goal-oriented behaviour in interpersonal circumstances. Skills associated with taking behavioural choices from both an influential and an affective perspective.